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25

Jul

valerianbr:

amandaonwriting:

Rewriting Checklist - 30 questions to ask when you’re rewriting your novel

interesting takeaways for short pieces as well

valerianbr:

amandaonwriting:

Rewriting Checklist - 30 questions to ask when you’re rewriting your novel

interesting takeaways for short pieces as well

23

Jul

(Source: thebullydogblog)

A letter to Knight-Commander Arval Lichter of the Dawnguard

Knight-Commander, Lord Arval Lichter,

 

I am Gavin Marshal of Honorgarde, direct descendent of Sir Malcolm Marshal. I write to you today with regards to my son Malcolm, a boy of seventeen. At just five years old, he caught a glimpse of Lord Charlton Roland and his lance at Honorgarde, and has since tirelessly dedicated himself to becoming a member of the Dawnguard.

 

He is a good, Lightly lad, and a strong squire, skilled with sword and lance beyond what any boy his age has right to be, but I fear all his Light bestowed talent will be wasted, should I keep him here much longer. He needs for naught but seasoning with proper knights. We have good men here to be sure, but I humbly ask you grant him an audience, with hopes that he might learn from your storied and noble order. I pray only that your Dawnguard might have a man amongst its ranks that can show him the way to greatness. He has the potential, he just needs the guidance of great men.

 

Grant us this, and I assure you he will serve with honor and distinction, befitting his house, the Dawn, the Crown, and the Light itself. I believe in my heart of hearts that with the guidance of your knights he will be an asset invaluable, standing strong against the enemies of Lordaeron as his ancestors always have.

 

With sincere respect,

Gavin Marshal

 

((Sorry if I made any mistakes with the style in the heading. They’re unintentional if existent. Also, so much thanks to ittybittyvibby for helping me through the whole process of trying to be more involved, as well as regalswag for tirelessly answering my questions, for they are numerous and frequent, and make me feel like a pest.))

the-wolf-and-moon:

I Felt Very Small

the-wolf-and-moon:

I Felt Very Small

entyle said: Sorry to keep pestering you with this, but who are the current Marshals living in the Dawn, and where would be a good place to branch the family tree?

regalswag:

There’s never been a real attempt to map the family, because generally Marshals fill in as “necessary soldiers of this era.” We know that a few of them are Wyllard, Corrine, and her brother but there are quite a few more.

Ultimately their utility has always been to be where they’re needed at the right time. As far as family trees go, I could probably build off of rosemary marshal and have them appear in the main tree.

That would be great.

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.
Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.
Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.
Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.
The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.

Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.

Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.

Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.

The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

22

Jul

raserus:

Let’s Play: GTA V || ‘Merica 

HERE IT IS.  YES.

You must have been the one driving the truck, eh Jere?

(Source: ahcrew)

iheartcrows:

Nevermore by PoesDaughter

maxkirin:

Neil Gaiman’s 8 Rules of Writing, a remake of this post. Source.

Want more writerly content? Make sure to follow maxkirin.tumblr.com for your daily dose of writer positivity, advice, and prompts!

regalswag:

dennys:

Guess the dessert?

pan + cake + chocolate (lab?) + sundae?
idfk

Hush puppy sundae.

regalswag:

dennys:

Guess the dessert?

pan + cake + chocolate (lab?) + sundae?

idfk

Hush puppy sundae.